About the Dog Aging Project

What is the Dog Aging Project?

The Dog Aging Project is an innovative research initiative that brings together a community of dogs, owners, veterinarians, researchers, and volunteers to carry out the most ambitious canine health study in the world. The Dog Aging Project team will follow tens of thousands of companion dogs for ten years or more in order to identify the biological, lifestyle, and environmental factors that maximize healthy longevity. We expect to gain insights that will increase our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat age-related diseases, thereby helping our dogs, and by extension, ourselves, live longer, healthier lives.

Why study dogs?

Dogs truly are science’s best friends. Though they age more rapidly than humans, they get the same diseases of aging, have a rich genetic make-up, and share our environment. Like humans, they have a sophisticated healthcare system. By studying aging in dogs, we can more quickly expand our knowledge of the aging process not just in dogs but also in humans. You can read more on our blog post entitled Dogs Are Science’s Best Friend.

Why not cats? Is there or will there be a Cat Aging Project?

There should be! While our team is dedicated to the study of dogs, canine aging, and canine health, we hope other researchers who study aging biology, gerontology, and veterinary medicine will follow our lead with studies of cats and other animals.

Who is conducting this research?

The Dog Aging Project includes expert scientists and research veterinarians from over 20 research institutions and veterinary teaching hospitals. Our core leadership is based at the University of Washington and Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Visit the Meet Our Team page on our website to get to know us better!

What are the core values of the Dog Aging Project?

Our team is committed to conducting rigorous, interdisciplinary scientific research and sharing our results in ways that benefit both dogs and humans. In all that we do, we prioritize the safety and well-being of our participants, both human and canine. We are dedicated to conducting our work with kindness, compassion, and the highest ethical standards.

What is community science?

Community science springs from the premise that anyone and everyone can think like a scientist. After all, at its most basic, scientific discovery is the result of a fundamental curiosity about the world and how it works. Scientists ask questions, make observations, design experiments, and collect data to answer our questions. You don’t need a PhD or a lab coat to make important contributions to the world’s body of knowledge. At the Dog Aging Project, we view the owners of enrolled dogs as key research partners. Our participants are the key to building an incredibly powerful dataset that will allow us to meet our scientific goals.

How can I learn more about the Dog Aging Project?

Scroll down to the bottom of this page to sign up for our monthly e-newsletter and subscribe to our blog posts.

Participating in the Dog Aging Project

Who can participate in the Dog Aging Project?

The Dog Aging Project is actively enrolling participants who live within the fifty US states (excluding US territories). Our human participants should have access to a computer (desktop or laptop) and reliable internet service so that they can complete online surveys about their dog.

Equity is a core value of the Dog Aging Project. We welcome participants from all walks of life, all racial and ethnic backgrounds, all abilities, and all gender and sexual orientations. (Some accommodations are available, and we are working to broaden our accessibility.) We are a scientific project, first and foremost, but we are also a community. We believe that both our science and our community are stronger when we include everyone.

What kinds of dogs are you studying?

ALL dogs are welcome! We want to study puppies and old dogs, mixed breed dogs and purebred dogs, healthy dogs and those with chronic health conditions. At the Dog Aging Project, we know that the key to understanding healthy aging in dogs is to learn from the broadest diversity possible. You can read more in our blog post entitled Calling ALL Dogs!

How do I sign up my dog?

Visit our homepage at dogagingproject.org and click the purple Nominate Your Dog button. You’ll be asked to complete a short survey that includes basic information about you and your dog, which will help us determine how to best include you in our research.

Can I nominate more than one dog?

During the sign-up process, we will ask you to provide basic information about all of your dogs. However, we can only enroll one dog per household. Littermates, housemates, and multigenerational groups can provide very interesting data, and some studies are specifically designed for them. At the Dog Aging Project, the goal is diversity among study participants. This is why we limit enrollment to one dog per household. In addition, this practice avoids errors and mix-ups during data collection, which could undermine the scientific integrity of our research, and it allows us to gather information from as many different environments as possible. You can read more in our blog post about this topic.

How do I decide which of my dogs to nominate for the Dog Aging Project?

When you sign up, you will see a list of things that we would like to know about your dog as well as activities, such as mobility exercises and cognitive games, that we may ask you to do with your dog. We recommend that you select the dog for whom you can provide the most information. The more we know about your dog’s entire life, the more we can learn from them.

What happens after I nominate my dog?

After you nominate your dog, you will receive an email invitation to set up your personal research portal at the Dog Aging Project. From your personal portal, you will be able to complete the Health and Life Experience Survey. This survey, carefully designed by our research team, consists of about 200 questions that collect information about your dog’s health, behavior, lifestyle, diet, personality, and much more. It’s very extensive, but don’t worry! You can take breaks and come back. We only ask that you complete it within six weeks. For more details, check out our blog post entitled Getting to Know You and Your Dog.

Upon completion of the survey, your dog will become an official member of the Dog Aging Project Pack! As the years pass, we will follow up with you and your dog, asking you to update the Health and Life Experience Survey and providing opportunities to participate in other aspects of our research. When your dog is a member of the DAP pack, we’re committed to maintaining a relationship with you and your dog for the entirety of your dog’s life!

If I am enrolled in the study, do I have to take my dog into a lab or a research location?

Dogs enrolled in the Dog Aging Project will continue to live and play in their home environments and continue to see their regular primary care veterinarians. If your dog is invited to participate in additional studies, we may ask you to take your dog to nearby veterinary specialists for additional laboratory tests. However, all parts of the study are completely voluntary, and you can decline to participate in additional studies at any time.

What does it cost to participate in the Dog Aging Project?

Other than the cost of your dog’s regular annual visit to your primary care veterinarian, there is no out-of-pocket cost to participate. If we invite your dog to participate in additional studies that require the collection of additional samples, some clinics may charge a small fee for this, but many will do it for free if samples are collected during your dog’s regular annual visit.

Will you provide veterinary advice for my dog?

While we have many veterinarians on our research team who are studying dog health, we believe that your dog’s primary care veterinarian is the best person to advise you on a treatment plan for specific health conditions. If you have concerns about your dog’s health, please visit your regular clinic and consult with your primary care veterinarian who has a relationship with your dog and understands their medical history.

Research Funding and Support

How is the project funded?

The Dog Aging Project is a non-profit research program funded by a grant from the National Institute on Aging, a part of the National Institutes of Health, and by private donations.

Do you make money off of enrolled dogs?

No, the Dog Aging Project does not sell data or information, nor do we make or sell any medical products. We are a non-profit, scientific study.

How can I support the Dog Aging Project?

We welcome donations to further our research objectives. You can donate to the Dog Aging Project through either of our primary sponsoring institutions, the University of Washington or Texas A&M University, by visiting our Donations page. 

Is my donation tax deductible?

Your donation to the Dog Aging Project through either the University of Washington or Texas A&M University is tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law in the United States. While neither organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, both institutions are governmental tax-exempt entities. Your donation, for tax purposes, can be treated as a donation to a nonprofit. For Canadian donors, your donation to the University of Washington is also fully tax-deductible to the extent permitted by Canadian law.

How will the Dog Aging Project use my donation?

Your donation will help build infrastructure, support our research team, provide sample and data collection kits, pay for diagnostic testing, and provide education to the public. A donation of $100 could pay for low-pass whole genome sequencing and associated data processing for one dog. A donation of $1,000 could support a research fellow for a week. A donation of $100,000 could help us develop new tests to understand aging.

Research Protocols

Are your scientific protocols available for review?

Within the Dog Aging Project, there are multiple lines of scientific inquiry. Each has specific protocols for data collection, participant selection, and data analysis. These protocols were vetted by the National Institute on Aging during the granting process. Everything that we do is guided by the animal care and welfare requirements of our academic institutions, which we satisfy at the highest level. If your dog is invited into additional studies beyond the Health and Life Experience Survey, you will be provided with details about the specific activities you would be asked to do with your dog in order for you to make an informed decision about whether or not to participate.

Are you conducting experiments on captive dogs?

We do not conduct, nor are we associated with, any research on laboratory or captive dogs. All the dogs enrolled in the project are companion dogs, living with their owners in private homes. The Dog Aging Project is primarily a longitudinal observational study. This means following the same research subjects over time (the longitudinal part of the study) and measuring, but not manipulating, the same variables over time (the observational part of the study). You can read more about this type of research in our blog post entitled The Power of Paying Attention.

Are you conducting clinical trials?

One of our additional studies is a clinical trial of the drug rapamycin, also called sirolimus, a prescription medication that is used in humans to treat cancer and to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients. When used at very low doses in laboratory mice, rapamycin seems to positively affect the way their bodies age. We are interested in discovering whether these benefits could be seen in dogs as well and whether there are unwanted side effects. Most dogs enrolled in the Dog Aging Project will not receive this drug, however, a small group of dogs, who meet specific age, weight, and location criteria, will be invited to participate. Each individual owner can decide whether or not to participate at that time. Participation in this portion of the study is completely voluntary. We do not recommend the use of this drug outside of our controlled clinical trial.

How do you protect participant privacy?

We respect the privacy of everyone associated with the Dog Aging Project and recognize that our research participants have volunteered to share their time and information with the DAP team in order to contribute to our scientific research. The personally identifying information of our participants, such as name and contact information, is encrypted and stored in a secure database. We never sell or share participant contact information. Canine health data are stored in our secure database under a unique identification number. This number does not include your actual name, address, or personally identifying information. More details are available in our Privacy Policy.

What does the Dog Aging Project do with the data it collects?

The Dog Aging Project is an open data initiative. This means that the Dog Aging Project data will be available to the public and other researchers. Anyone who is interested will be allowed to analyze the data we collect and to give presentations and write papers about their discoveries. All data (fully anonymized) will be accessible through Terra, a data platform maintained by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Learn more from our blog post entitled What is Open Data?

Information for Participating Veterinarians

What to do if the blood clots in the non-clotting tubes and samples have to be re-drawn?

When collecting samples, be very careful to prevent blood clotting or loss of sample once it has been placed into the tube. The way our receiving lab is set up, we cannot accept replacement or redraw tubes due to the lack of barcoding on the new tube. Some of our tubes will have barcode labels fully surrounding them, so you will be unable to visualize the micro blood clots that do form.

What if all samples cannot be obtained?

In kits for larger sized dogs, if a sample cannot be obtained, the sample will be skipped for that collection period. In our smaller dogs, who will have their samples collected across two visits, samples that cannot be collected during the first visit can be collected and sent in during the second visit. Please do not use samples that have been collected more than one hour prior to the visit. When possible, samples should be collected within the visit timespan.

Who sends in the samples and are there specific mailing instructions?

Samples will be sent in by your clinic. When you receive the samples box for collection, there will be a pre-paid mailing label in the box for the box to be shipped to our receiving lab. Prior to shipping, stick this label over the previous mailing label and tape down the edges of the outer cardboard box.

Career and Collaboration Opportunities

Are you hiring? If so, how do I join the Dog Aging Project team?

Current job openings can be found on our Careers page.

Are there opportunities for postdoctoral researchers or fellows?

The Dog Aging Project is delighted to work with early career researchers and veterinary clinicians. These opportunities will become available in various labs based on the annual academic cycle. Open positions will be posted on our Careers page.

Can I collaborate with your team at the Dog Aging Project?

If you’re a researcher interested in collaborating with us, please submit your contact details and collaboration ideas here. A  member of our team will be in touch.

Participant FAQs

General Technical Support

What if the link to set up my personal portal doesn’t work?

The link contained in the email invitation to set up your personal portal is a one-time use link. Once it is clicked it deactivates. This was done to ensure that your personal portal would be as secure as possible. Please email us at team@dogagingproject.org, and a member of our support team can send you a new link.

How do I reset my password?

To change your password, log in to your personal portal at portal.dogagingproject.org. In the upper right corner of the main screen, click on the icon of a purple person to see a drop-down menu, and choose “Manage Login.” Then choose “Change your password” and fill in the requested information.

How do I log in to my personal portal?

Once you have created your personal portal, you can log in by returning to portal.dogagingproject.org or using the “Portal Login” button on our website at dogagingproject.org.

How do I update my contact information?

Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Update My Profile.” You can use this at any time to update your contact information, including your address, phone number, email, or veterinary clinic information.

Why are you asking for an alternate contact person?

To meet our scientific goals, we want to maintain lifelong relationships with the dogs in our study. We ask for an alternate contact in the unusual event that we are unable to reach you.

How do I update my veterinary clinic information?

Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Update My Profile.” You can use this at any time to update the contact information for your veterinary clinic. 

Why am I not receiving emails from you?

Email is our primary mode of communication with our participants. You may need to add our email team@dogagingproject.org to your contacts to ensure that our emails don’t end up in your spam folder.

The Nomination Process

What happens after I nominate my dog?

After you nominate your dog, we will send you an invitation to set up your personal portal on our secure research platform. If we are experiencing extremely high participation, this may take from 2-8 weeks. Please add our email team@dogagingproject.org to your contacts to ensure that this invitation doesn’t end up in your spam folder.

Once you set up your personal portal, you will be able to complete the Health and Life Experience Survey. Upon completion of the survey, your dog will become an official member of the Dog Aging Project Pack!

Can I nominate a different dog?

Once you have set up your personal portal, your research profile is linked to your nominated dog and to your email address, and we can’t switch your enrollment to a different dog.

If you haven’t created your personal portal yet, please email us at team@dogagingproject.org. We will delete your previous nomination, after which you will be able to submit a new nomination through our website at dogagingproject.org.

Can I nominate more than one dog?

We only accept one nomination per household. Littermates, housemates, and multi-generational groups can provide very interesting data, and some studies are specifically designed for them. At the Dog Aging Project, the goal is diversity among study participants. We want to study the widest possible range of genetics and environment to determine how those factors affect aging. We also want to include as many households as possible.

What if the dog I nominated is no longer a member of my household?

If you haven’t created your personal portal yet, please email us at team@dogagingproject.org. We will delete your previous nomination, after which you will be able to submit a new nomination through our website at www.dogagingproject.org. Once you have set up your personal portal, your research profile is linked to your nominated dog and to your email address, and we can’t switch your enrollment to a different dog. If you have completed the Health and Life Experience Survey and your dog is a member of the Dog Aging Project Pack, you can log in to your personal portal and use the purple button that says “Report a Major Event” to tell us that your dog is no longer a member of your household.

What if my dog’s breed (or breed combination) is not on your list of choices?

The drop-down menu of breeds available in Nomination Survey and in the Health and Life Experience Survey is based on the list provided by the American Kennel Club. If you have a rare, new, or otherwise non-AKC recognized breed, please select “My dog is a non-AKC purebred not listed here.” This will give you an opportunity to enter your dog’s exact breed. In the Health Status section of the Health and Life Experience Survey, you will have the ability to enter whatever additional information you would like us to know about your dog.

What if I don’t know my dog’s breed?

No problem! We tried to simplify the survey process by using a drop-down menu, which is based on recognized American Kennel Club breeds. If your dog has no obvious dominant breed, select the next closest breed or “Unknown.” In the Health Status section of the Health and Life Experience Survey, you will have the ability to enter whatever additional information you would like us to know.

The Health and Life Experience Survey

What questions are on the Health and Life Experience Survey?

The Health and Life Experience Survey is the foundation for all research conducted by the Dog Aging Project. It consists of ten sections and asks 200+ questions about lifestyle, environment, behavior and health. You can read more in our blog post entitled Getting to Know You and Your Dog.

Should I answer the questions on the Health and Life Experience Survey for how my dog was as a puppy or for how they are now?

Complete the Health and Life Experience Survey for your dog right now at their current age. You will have an opportunity to update the Health and Life Experience Survey every year, which allows us to understand how your dog changes with age. There will be additional opportunities to tell us about your dog’s early life experiences. You can read more in our blog post entitled The Power of Paying Attention.

What if my dog passes away before I complete the Health and Life Experience Survey?

The team at the Dog Aging Project is absolutely committed to supporting you through this difficult time. We want to have a life-long relationship with your dog and that means sharing in your dog’s passing as well.

If you have not yet completed the Health and Life Experience Survey, you have two options. You can contact our team at team@dogagingproject.org, and we can remove your dog’s information from our system. This would allow you to nominate a different dog now or at some point in the future.

Or, you can complete the survey for the dog who has passed. After doing so, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Report a Major Event.” You can use this feature to inform us of your dog’s passing. In addition to reaching out with our condolences, we will give you the opportunity to tell us about the circumstances surrounding your dog’s end of life. This information will help us find ways to extend the period of life spent free of disease and discomfort for future generations of dogs. We hope this will provide some comfort in your loss.

What if I don’t know how to answer a question on the Health and Life Experience Survey?

The Health and Life Experience Survey is meant to give us an overview of your dog’s current health history, lifestyle, and environment. Our survey can’t capture every possible circumstance for all dogs in all environments, and to avoid bias in our research, we can’t help you decide how to answer. We ask that you answer the questions to the best of your ability about your dog right now at their current age.

How do I give you more information about my dog?

As you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, you may want to give us more detail like what brand of food your dog eats. There will be opportunities for this. We’ll offer you several shorter surveys over the years to come focused on more specific subjects. There are sections within the survey where you can provide information that you feel we may have missed in the regular survey questions.

How long do I have to complete the Health and Life Experience Survey?

The Health and Life Experience Survey is very extensive, but don’t worry! You can take breaks and come back. We only ask that you complete it within six weeks.

Can I change my answers to the survey questions after I’ve submitted it?

If something about your dog’s daily routine or health has changed since you submitted your survey responses, you will have an opportunity to update this information on an annual basis. In general, we don’t make alterations to response in order to protect the integrity of our data collection process.

Why are you asking for personal information about me?

This study is a comprehensive investigation of dog health. That means we want to study ALL dogs from ALL kinds of homes. We use the demographic information to monitor ourselves, not you! We separate your personal identification (name, email, etc.) from the information about age or income, then we look at the anonymous information to make sure that we have people from all walks of life in the study.

Equity is a core value of the Dog Aging Project. We are a scientific project, first and foremost, but we are also a community. We believe that both our science and our community are stronger when we include everyone.

Obtaining and Uploading Veterinary Electronic Medical Records

Why do you want my dog’s veterinary electronic medical records?

In order to invite your dog to participate in some additional studies, our veterinary team needs to closely examine each dog’s comprehensive medical records. These experts will be looking for specific conditions or characteristics that fit the requirements of the study. However, for the vast majority of our research, veterinary electronic medical records are not necessary. You can read more in our blog post entitled What’s in a veterinary medical record anyway?

How do I obtain my dog’s veterinary electronic medical records?

Call your primary care veterinarian and any speciality veterinarians who care for your dog and let them know that you are part of a scientific research study. Ask them to email your dog’s comprehensive medical record to you, so that you can upload it. Invoices, receipts, vaccine histories, reminders, and handwritten records do not provide us with sufficient information for our scientific study, and therefore will not be accepted.

If your clinic doesn’t use a computer-based medical software program for their veterinary records, then they won’t be able to provide a format we can use. That’s okay! Veterinary electronic medical records aren’t required for participation in the Dog Aging Project.

What information needs to be in my dog’s veterinary electronic medical records?

A comprehensive veterinary medical record should contain the following components:

  • Physical examination findings and doctor’s notes
  • Preventive health care history (vaccinations, parasitism screening, deworming, and heartworm preventives)
  • Any diagnostics (blood, urine, cultures, radiographs) performed with results
  • Any surgeries performed with findings
  • Any documentation sent to your regular veterinarian after referral or emergency clinic visits to a different veterinarian for this dog

What file formats do you accept for veterinary electronic medical records?

Your dog’s veterinary electronic medical records must be in an acceptable electronic format such as .pdf, .doc, .docx, .txt, or .rtf. This means that your veterinary clinic must use a veterinary medical software program to track all information related to your dog’s care.

Our system is only designed to work with computer-generated records in one of the above formats. We can’t open .zip, .html, or image files. You must be able to upload your records into your personal portal. We can’t accept records mailed or faxed directly to us from you or your veterinarian.

How do I upload my dog’s veterinary electronic medical records?

Once you have digital files in an appropriate format (.pdf, .doc, .docx, .txt, .rtf), login to your personal portal and complete the task called “Upload your dog’s medical record.” You will be able to upload up to 10 different files. If you have more than 10 files, you need to combine them using a word process software program or a PDF program such as Adobe Acrobat DC or PDFsam Basic, which is free and tutorials are available online. Make sure that you have all your records ready before you start, because once you select “Submit” on the task, it will close permanently and you won’t be able to upload additional records.

What if my dog has been treated by different veterinarians at multiple veterinary clinics?

If possible, please try to obtain veterinary electronic medical records from all possible providers before beginning the medical records upload task.

What if my dog’s veterinary medical records are contained in many different files?

In your personal portal, you can upload up to 10 files through the “Upload your dog’s medical record” task. If you have more than 10 files, you need to combine them using a word process software program or a PDF program such as Adobe Acrobat DC or PDFsam Basic, which is free and tutorials are available online.

How do I deal with handwritten veterinary records?

We don’t have the capacity to analyze handwritten veterinary medical records even if they are scanned into a digital file. If you call your veterinary clinic and they say that they use handwritten records, that’s okay. Veterinary electronic medical records aren’t required for participation in the Dog Aging Project.

How do I stop the reminder emails about my dog’s medical records?

If you can’t obtain your dog’s veterinary medical records or if they are handwritten, please log in to your personal portal and select the task called “Upload your dog’s medical record.” You will be able to indicate that you were not able to obtain the records or that they were in an incompatible format. Once you submit the task, the reminders will stop.

If I can’t upload my dog’s medical records, can I still be part of the study?

Absolutely! Only a small fraction of our additional studies require the submission of veterinary electronic medical records. Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your dog is a member of the Dog Aging Project Pack, and you will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of studies during the course of your dog’s life.

Membership in the Dog Aging Project Pack

What happens now that my dog is a member of the Dog Aging Project Pack?

Upon completion of the Health and Life Experience Survey, your dog will become an official member of the Dog Aging Project Pack! As the years pass, we will follow up with you and your dog, asking you to update the Health and Life Experience Survey and providing opportunities to participate in other aspects of our research. When your dog is a member of the DAP pack, we’re committed to maintaining a relationship with you and your dog for the entirety of your dog’s life!

Why is there a time limit on completing some of my tasks?

For our statistical analyses to be valid, we need to collect all data within a set window of time. This allows us to make meaningful comparisons.

Where do I find instructional materials?

The answers to many common questions are available in these FAQs. When specific tasks require detailed extra instructions these will be available in your personal portal. Links will appear in your Task List on both the To-Do tab and the Completed tab. Instructional materials may appear as PDF documents and/or links to videos that demonstrate how to complete that specific task.

Didn’t I already complete this survey?

Every year we will ask you to update the Health and Life Experience Survey. This provides you an opportunity to tell us if anything has changed about your dog’s health, activity, living situation, and behavior. Our research team will compare how your responses change over time to understanding the aging process in dogs.

How do I update my personal profile?

Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Update My Profile.” You can use this at any time to update your contact information, including your address, phone number, email, or veterinary clinic information.

What if my living situation changes?

Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Update My Profile.” You can use this at any time to update your contact information, including your address, phone number, email, or veterinary clinic information.

Additionally, when you are prompted to update the Health and Life Experience Survey (annually), you will have an opportunity to update your address and describe your dog’s new living situation.

What should I do if my dog is experiencing a medical condition?

While we have many veterinarians on our research team who are studying dog health, we believe that your dog’s primary care veterinarian is the best person to advise you on a treatment plan for specific health conditions. If you have concerns about your dog’s health, please visit your regular clinic and consult with your primary care veterinarian who has a relationship with your dog and understands their medical history.

What is a Major Event and how do I report one?

Over the course of our journey with our canine companions, the circumstances of our lives can change. Sometimes dogs run away and can’t be found, sometimes they go to live with another family, and of course, sometimes our best friends pass away.

Once you complete the Health and Life Experience Survey, your personal portal will display a purple button above your task list that says “Report a Major Event.” You can use this at any time to let us know if your dog is no longer a member of your household.

Eventually, you will be able to use this section of your portal to alert us about other major events such as reproductive activity. We appreciate your patience as we expand these functions.

What happens if my dog dies?

The team at the Dog Aging Project is absolutely committed to supporting you through this difficult time. We want to have a life-long relationship with your dog and that means sharing in your dog’s passing as well.

When your dog dies, you can use the purple button above your task list that says “Report a Major Event” to inform us. In addition to reaching out with our condolences, we will give you the opportunity to tell us about the circumstances surrounding your dog’s end of life. This information will help us find ways to extend the period of life spent free of disease and discomfort for future generations of dogs. We hope this will provide some comfort in your loss.

What are the additional studies being conducted by the Dog Aging Project?

Currently, we have three additional studies that include subsets of dogs already in the Dog Aging Project Pack. These include a genetic study called Foundation; a physiology study called Precision; and a controlled, clinical trial of a drug called rapamycin called TRIAD. To select dogs for these cohorts, our research team will be trying to balance age, gender, size, breed, and geography. If your dog is invited to join any of these additional studies, we will give you more detailed information, and you will be able to decide whether or not you want to participate.

Can I be removed from this study?

We understand that life gets busy, and it can, at times feel overwhelming to be part of a long-term study such as this. All of the activities in this study are completely voluntary. If you don’t have the time to complete all research tasks, that’s okay. If you would prefer to have your personal portal closed so that you don’t receive any more research tasks from us. Please contact our support desk.

Information for Journalists

If you are a journalist hoping to do a story on the Dog Aging Project, please contact our media liaison at team@dogagingproject.org.

Still Have Questions?

Our support team can be reached at team@dogagingproject.org. At this time, we are experiencing an extremely high volume of support requests. Our current response time is approximately 5-7 days. Thanks for your patience!